Tag Archive | pitch cv

Moog Werkstatt: adding a proper Gate input

Note: I make reference to the Moog Werkstatt schematics throughout. Copyright prevents me reposting them here; they can be found on Moog’s website.

In its original form, the Werkstatt’s own keyboard generates the Gate signal to trigger the envelope, and there is no obvious ‘Gate Input’ on the header. The existing Gate Out can be (ab?)used as a Gate In, but it’s not ideal, because as with most of these header points, anything coming in here isn’t buffered from the internal signal.

Adding a proper Gate In to the Werkstatt is straightforward enough, though a little more involved than the CV input; my approach doesn’t require the cutting of any traces, the only hack-work being the hole in the enclosure for a jack socket. It does require the end of one wire to be soldered to rather small SMT (surface-mount) components though, so you’ll need a suitably fine tip for your iron and a steady hand.

Werkstatt gate mod schematic

Werkstatt Gate Input mod schematic

 

How it Works

The Werkstatt’s keyboard scanner outputs a logic high at U19 pin 3 when it detects a key press. As well as stopping the scan and loading the current key value into a latch (which feeds the VCO CV), this signal is buffered to provide a Gate, and differentiated to provide a Trigger. The Key On signal is buffered inversely by the Schmitt trigger of U14-F before being flipped back positive by U14-D. In order to add our external gate without affecting any other part of the keyboard circuit, we only need to bring the input of U14-D low. In this way, we can use both the Werkstatt’s own keyboard and an external Gate without having to switch between control sources.

The solution is to use a simple NPN in saturation to take U14 pin 9 to ground when its base is taken high. In other words, a positive external Gate will take the gate inverter input low, just as does the keyboard gate detector. Because there is a diode in the way (D14), our added transistor is isolated from the keyboard scanner clock and data-bus, so there won’t be any accidental mis-readings of the keyboard CV.

Another advantage of this solution is that the Werkstatt’s own envelope retains its Gate/Trigger operating modes, as our external Gate also gets differentiated; we are activating the Werkstatt’s envelope, not over-riding it.

The modification takes just four components and a socket, and fits easily on the PCB. The hardest part is soldering the wire from the collector of the transistor to the appropriate point on the Werkstatt’s circuit – I chose to solder it across the connection between R89 and C64, as the two solder points make a convenient place to lay a thin wire and give it a firmer purchase.

I presume you’ll be doing both CV and Gate input mods; the socket ground can be wired to the CV In socket ground, which I wired to a solder tag around the nearby PCB mounting screw (see also the CV Input page).

Werkstatt gate input mod smt solder point

Werkstatt Gate Input mod SMT solder point

 

Werkstatt gate mod extra components highlighted

Werkstatt Gate Input mod extra components highlighted (PCB top)

 

Werkstatt gate mod PCB rear highlighted

Werkstatt Gate Input mod extra components highlighted (PCB rear)

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Parts Used:

33k 1/4W 1% MF resistor
100k 1/4W 1% MF resistor
1N4148 signal diode
BC549C NPN transistor
1/8” panel mount socket
wire

These parts are what I had handy. Pretty much any NPN with reasonable gain can be used here, and the signal diode is a generic one.

Moog Werkstatt: adding a proper CV input

Note: I make reference to the Moog Werkstatt schematics throughout. Copyright prevents me reposting them here; they can be found on Moog’s website.

The existing header on the Werkstatt allows for a VCO pitch CV to be patched in. Although the pitch can already be modulated by either the LFO or the EG (selected using a panel switch), the patch header input means you can use both modulation sources simultaneously – or an external CV, if you can cable it up.

When you start wanting to connect control sources to the Werkstatt, one problem is pretty obvious: the patch pin header provides a signal path, but there’s no ground. The user manual suggests hacking cables together, taking a ground from the cable to a screw on the case (or the ground on the audio output jack), but this isn’t a very neat solution. Better to add a proper CV input jack so you can directly and simply hook up your external CV source using standard cables.

Moog themselves (at the time of writing) do sell an add-on jack board, which provides both a row of minijacks and a signal ground, but I decided against buying it for two reasons: 1) it still doesn’t offer a true Gate input, which I felt necessary; 2) the jack board replaces the patch pin header – adding mods like mine means you can use them and the patch pins simultaneously, giving more possibilities.

How it Works

The circuit is very simple. Looking at p.2 of the official schematic, we can see the existing header CV input is mixed in via a resistor R46 and trimmer VR5. This trimmer can be carefully adjusted to give a 1V/octave response for your external CV.

It would be super-easy to simply wire a jack to the CV point on the header, but this has the disadvantage that inputs are not isolated from each other. Better (and still easy) is to replicate the two passive components and route them to the same mix point.

Here are my additions to the circuit:

Werkstatt CV modification schematic

Werkstatt CV modification schematic

Here is the mod in situ:

Werkstatt CV input mod (top)

Werkstatt CV input mod (top)

Werkstatt CV input mod, rear

Werkstatt CV input mod (rear)

The handiest solder points for connecting the extra components to the existing circuit are TP14 and TP10. Either will do:

Werkstatt CV input mod routing

Werkstatt CV input mod routing

The jack is wired to be brought to the side panel beneath the header. In this photo the Gate mod jack is also in place. The jack grounds are wired together, and then to a solder tag that connects to the nearby screw post. The existing screw is long enough to accommodate a washer or two:

Werkstatt mod ground point

Werkstatt mod ground point

Drilling the hole in the case is simple and quick, and a label finishes the job:

Werkstatt with CV and Gate mods

Werkstatt with CV and Gate mods

The accompanying Gate Input mod is also detailed on this site.

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Parts Used

68k 1/4W 1% MF resistor
100k trimmer
1/8” panel mount socket
3mm solder tag
3mm washers (x2)
wire

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