Tag Archive | Moog

Moog Werkstatt: improving the VCO and VCF direct outs

There are three ways to get audio from your Werkstatt: the VCO direct out, the VCF direct out (both on the pin header), and the main audio out (the 1/4″ jack on the rear panel).

The VCO Out signal is a sawtooth or pulse, depending which wave the VCO is switched to, at 0-5V. This is pure, dry VCO with no further processing, though of course it will be pitch- and/or pulse-width-modulated, depending on your modulation routings. The VCF Out is taken directly from the output of the filter, bypassing the VCA, and is nominally -2V to +2V. The main audio out is at typical line level (a couple of volts peak to peak), and comes through the filter and VCA.

If you want to use the Werkstatt as an extra oscillator for a modular, for example, you’ll probably want to use the VCO direct out. If you’re running the filtered sound into an external VCA for more varied amplitude modulation or to use with a high-pass filter maybe, you will probably want to take the Werkstatt’s audio directly from the VCF out. If you’re using the Werkstatt as a standalone expander, the main audio out will do just fine.

If signal levels were the same all the way along, none of this would be a problem. However, as with other aspects of the Werkstatt’s design, it needs some tweaking to integrate perfectly. Here’s how.

VCO direct out

Let’s say you’re using the VCO direct out. Eurorack has typical VCO signals of 10 volts peak-to-peak (see Doepfer’s Signals in the A-100 section, for example), centred around 0V (that is, -5V to +5V). To get the closest match sonically we want the Werkstatt’s output to match the other oscillators you’re using. Not all modules with mixers on board will boost as well as cut their inputs, so we can add a small circuit to give a true -5V to +5V VCO Out on the Werkstatt. The schematic below shows both the VCO and VCF mods. More on the VCF shortly.

Schematic for improved VCO and VCF direct outs on the Moog Werkstatt

Schematic for improved VCO and VCF direct outs on the Moog Werkstatt

How It Works

The VCO out mod is a basic non-inverting amplifier with an offset to make the positive-only signal bipolar. The gain is set by the two 20k resistors (1+20k/20k = 1+1 = 2) and the unity-gain reference point is at 5V. That is, 5V in gives 5V out. 0V in would be a difference of -5V from this reference point, so this is multiplied by the gain of 2 to give a difference of -10V, which taken from the +5V reference gives -5V out. In this way, the 0-5V input becomes -5V to +5V out. You can see it in action at this link. Below is a screenshot of the simulation.

Simulation of the improved Werkstatt output mod in Falstad

The improved Werkstatt output mod  demonstrated using Falstad’s online simulator

VCF out

Likewise, if you want to run the Werkstatt’s VCF output into an external module, boosting the signal to match requires just a small circuit, almost identical to the first. The signal level drops as resonance is increased, but to keep our circuit simple we won’t worry about that. The schematic is on the same sheet as the VCO output, posted earlier on this page.

How It Works

This is also a non-inverting amplifier, but this time with no offset as the VCF signal is already bipolar – all the amplification happens around a 0V centre point. Positive signals get more positive, negative signals get more negative. The VCF direct out is normally about 5V peak to peak at maximum, so we just double that to get the more useful 10V range. The gain is set the same way as the previous circuit, and we get an output of -5 to +5V maximum.

Installing the mod

I built both these circuits onto a small piece of stripboard mounted onto the panel with one of the minijacks. There’s just enough room, as can be seen in the photos. This allows the use of both halves of a dual op-amp so nothing goes to waste. There’s also plenty of room on the experiment pads at the top of the Werkstatt’s PCB, though you may find it a bit cramped if you’ve already got a couple of mods in there like I have…

The photos show the locations on the PCB of the various supply rails you’ll be wiring up to: -9V and +9V to power the op-amp, +5V for the VCO amplifier reference, and GND. These are all labelled on the top side of the PCB anyway so it’s easy to find them. I shared the ground that my existing mods were already using, which is connected to the nearby screw post via a solder tag. See my CV mod for details.

Werkstatt VCO and VCF direct out mod wiring

Werkstatt VCO and VCF direct out mod wiring

 

Werkstatt VCO and VCF direct output mod installed

Werkstatt VCO and VCF direct output mod installed

 

Werkstatt VCO and VCF direct output mod external appearance

Werkstatt VCO and VCF direct output mod external appearance

 

Before and after: VCO and VCF direct outs. Top image 1V scale, bottom image 5V scale

Before and after: VCO and VCF direct outs. Top image 1V scale, bottom image 5V scale

Parts

U1: TL072 or equivalent
R1, R5: 10k (1/4W 1% Metal Film used here, but it’s not critical)
R2, 3, 6, 7: 20k
R4, 8: 1k
jacks, wire, stripboard: as per your own choice

Moog Werkstatt: adding a VCA CV input jack

I’ve already blogged about the reasons you might want to mod your Werkstatt, and have posted a list of mods here, so to complete the VCO/VCF/VCA trio, here’s the VCA input at last!

How it Works

This is a very simple mod, and just replicates the existing patch header input. All you need is a 10k resistor, some wire, and a jack socket.

Werkstatt VCA CV input mod schematic

Werkstatt VCA CV input mod schematic

The easiest point to solder to on the board is JMP62. This is located just above the Decay pot. This point is where incoming VCA CV signals are passively mixed. It’s probably best to solder the new parts to this jumper on the underside of the PCB, which you can see on the photos of the wiring:

Werkstatt VCA input JMP62 location

Werkstatt VCA input: JMP62 location

Werkstatt VCA input JMP62 on underside of PCB

Werkstatt VCA input: JMP62 on underside of PCB

Werkstatt VCA input soldering

Werkstatt VCA input: soldering

Werkstatt VCA input panel

Werkstatt VCA input: side panel

Parts

10k resistor
Jack socket
Wire

Further thoughts

As the Werkstatt already has a pin for VCA modulation on its patch header, you might think this mod seems less immediately useful than the VCO or VCF CV inputs. The main issue is that there is no way to simply switch off the Werkstatt’s own VCA – you can select EG shaping, or ‘on’ for drones, but you can’t bypass it for use with an external envelope. What does this mean in practice, and why bother adding a CV input for it?

If you’re using the Werkstsatt with a modular, you’ll have more interesting envelopes than the attack-decay type on the Werkstatt. You might well also have something that will give an offset. It should be possible to use a negative offset to counteract the Werkstatt’s ‘on’ VCA CV, and mix in a more interesting envelope signal; setting the Werkstatt’s VCA to ‘on’ and feeding this CV input with that mix will then allow you to contour the Werkstatt’s VCA as you like.

It would also allow you to use the Werkstatt’s own patchbay to feed the VCA with its LFO, and simultaneously blend another LFO in with this CV mod. Mixing different LFOs gives a lot of movement to a sound, and can be very enjoyable to play with. You can also sequence the VCA level this way, while retaining other modulation via the pin header.

As always, my mods are not definitive – the best thing to do is experiment, and adapt, and find out what works for you and this excellent little synthesizer. Enjoy!

Moog Werkstatt: adding a proper Filter CV input

Note: I make reference to the Moog Werkstatt schematics throughout. Copyright prevents me reposting them here; they can be found on Moog’s website.

After the VCO Frequency CV and Gate inputs, perhaps the next most useful control we can modify is the VCF cutoff frequency. The Werkstatt already has switches to select either LFO or EG filter modulation in positive or negative amounts. Many synthesizers also have a Keyboard Tracking control which routes the CV generated by the pitch control source to the filter cutoff, allowing the filter to open up as higher notes are played. The amount of this modulation is often governed by a pot — giving continuous variable control — but is also often implemented with a switch — giving either preset amounts of modulation, or at its most basic just on/off (that is, 100% or nothing). At 100% Keyboard Tracking, a self-resonant filter can be used as a sine wave oscillator, the pitch of which will follow the keyboard.

Various filter tracking controls

Various filter tracking controls

 

The Werkstatt’s filter has a CV input on the header, which is fine for simple self-patching, but two problems show themselves when you want to control this parameter from an external source: firstly, the necessity of hacking a cable together as described previously; secondly, the accuracy of tracking. The Werkstatt’s existing filter CV input point does not, in my experience, give accurate 100% tracking from an external V/oct CV, which spoils sounds that require the resonance to boost harmonics that are locked to note pitch.

The mod below overcomes these problems by giving the Werkstatt a separate, tunable Filter CV Input that can be trimmed to give suitably accurate pitch tracking.

How it Works

As with the Pitch CV Input mod, we’re going to simply duplicate the existing control input and make a slight alteration. The existing header input for cutoff control mixes its CV via a 47.5k resistor. In order to be able to give tunable tracking, this mod is going to use a 43k resistor and a 10k variable trimmer in series. 100% tracking should be somewhere towards one end of the trimmer’s range.

Werkstatt filter CV mod schematic

Werkstatt filter CV mod schematic

 

Solder the two extra components to the board, take the third leg of the trimmer to TP17 (purple wire in the photos below), and take the outer leg of the resistor to the input jack, which is mounted and grounded exactly as for the CV and Gate jacks.

 

Werkstatt filter CV input mod PCB top

Werkstatt filter CV input mod PCB top

 

Werkstatt filter CV input mod PCB rear

Werkstatt filter CV input mod PCB rear

 

Werkstatt filter CV input mod rear wiring

Werkstatt filter CV input mod rear wiring

 

Werkstatt filter CV input mod jacks

Werkstatt filter CV input mod jacks

 

Fine Tuning

Tuning the tracking is similar to tuning the pitch (a process described in the manual) — with the Werkstatt open, connect the external CV and play as normal, using full resonance on the filter, with the cutoff tuned so you can hear the pitch of its self-oscillation. Adjust the trimmer so the filter’s resonant frequency scales up the keyboard at the same rate as the note pitch — that is, two notes played an octave apart should give a resonant filter peak an octave apart.

Because the Werkstatt’s VCO cannot be silenced without modification, it might be easier to disconnect the pitch CV control while tuning the filter; alternatively, if you have a way of multing the pitch CV, connect it to both pitch and filter. You might try setting the filter to resonate at an obvious harmonic such as a 5th above the pitch, as any deviation in the tracking will result in some noticeable sonic artefacts.

More Ideas

Of course, you might not want a simple fixed 100% tracking filter. It would be possible to add a pot to allow the user to vary the tracking amount; you could install a switch to select between different resistors to give preset fixed trackings; you could route the pitch CV to a break-contact on the filter CV input jack so that it tracks by default unless a jack in insterted to over-ride it. My own mod is simple and quick and functional, and hopefully will provide a point of departure for your own experimentation.

 

Werkstatt filter CV input mod in use

Werkstatt filter CV input mod in use

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Parts used:

43k 1/4W 1% MF resistor
10k trimmer
1/8″ panel mount jack socket

Moog Werkstatt: adding a proper Gate input

Note: I make reference to the Moog Werkstatt schematics throughout. Copyright prevents me reposting them here; they can be found on Moog’s website.

In its original form, the Werkstatt’s own keyboard generates the Gate signal to trigger the envelope, and there is no obvious ‘Gate Input’ on the header. The existing Gate Out can be (ab?)used as a Gate In, but it’s not ideal, because as with most of these header points, anything coming in here isn’t buffered from the internal signal.

Adding a proper Gate In to the Werkstatt is straightforward enough, though a little more involved than the CV input; my approach doesn’t require the cutting of any traces, the only hack-work being the hole in the enclosure for a jack socket. It does require the end of one wire to be soldered to rather small SMT (surface-mount) components though, so you’ll need a suitably fine tip for your iron and a steady hand.

Werkstatt gate mod schematic

Werkstatt Gate Input mod schematic

 

How it Works

The Werkstatt’s keyboard scanner outputs a logic high at U19 pin 3 when it detects a key press. As well as stopping the scan and loading the current key value into a latch (which feeds the VCO CV), this signal is buffered to provide a Gate, and differentiated to provide a Trigger. The Key On signal is buffered inversely by the Schmitt trigger of U14-F before being flipped back positive by U14-D. In order to add our external gate without affecting any other part of the keyboard circuit, we only need to bring the input of U14-D low. In this way, we can use both the Werkstatt’s own keyboard and an external Gate without having to switch between control sources.

The solution is to use a simple NPN in saturation to take U14 pin 9 to ground when its base is taken high. In other words, a positive external Gate will take the gate inverter input low, just as does the keyboard gate detector. Because there is a diode in the way (D14), our added transistor is isolated from the keyboard scanner clock and data-bus, so there won’t be any accidental mis-readings of the keyboard CV.

Another advantage of this solution is that the Werkstatt’s own envelope retains its Gate/Trigger operating modes, as our external Gate also gets differentiated; we are activating the Werkstatt’s envelope, not over-riding it.

The modification takes just four components and a socket, and fits easily on the PCB. The hardest part is soldering the wire from the collector of the transistor to the appropriate point on the Werkstatt’s circuit – I chose to solder it across the connection between R89 and C64, as the two solder points make a convenient place to lay a thin wire and give it a firmer purchase.

I presume you’ll be doing both CV and Gate input mods; the socket ground can be wired to the CV In socket ground, which I wired to a solder tag around the nearby PCB mounting screw (see also the CV Input page).

Werkstatt gate input mod smt solder point

Werkstatt Gate Input mod SMT solder point

 

Werkstatt gate mod extra components highlighted

Werkstatt Gate Input mod extra components highlighted (PCB top)

 

Werkstatt gate mod PCB rear highlighted

Werkstatt Gate Input mod extra components highlighted (PCB rear)

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Parts Used:

33k 1/4W 1% MF resistor
100k 1/4W 1% MF resistor
1N4148 signal diode
BC549C NPN transistor
1/8” panel mount socket
wire

These parts are what I had handy. Pretty much any NPN with reasonable gain can be used here, and the signal diode is a generic one.

Moog Werkstatt: adding a proper CV input

Note: I make reference to the Moog Werkstatt schematics throughout. Copyright prevents me reposting them here; they can be found on Moog’s website.

The existing header on the Werkstatt allows for a VCO pitch CV to be patched in. Although the pitch can already be modulated by either the LFO or the EG (selected using a panel switch), the patch header input means you can use both modulation sources simultaneously – or an external CV, if you can cable it up.

When you start wanting to connect control sources to the Werkstatt, one problem is pretty obvious: the patch pin header provides a signal path, but there’s no ground. The user manual suggests hacking cables together, taking a ground from the cable to a screw on the case (or the ground on the audio output jack), but this isn’t a very neat solution. Better to add a proper CV input jack so you can directly and simply hook up your external CV source using standard cables.

Moog themselves (at the time of writing) do sell an add-on jack board, which provides both a row of minijacks and a signal ground, but I decided against buying it for two reasons: 1) it still doesn’t offer a true Gate input, which I felt necessary; 2) the jack board replaces the patch pin header – adding mods like mine means you can use them and the patch pins simultaneously, giving more possibilities.

How it Works

The circuit is very simple. Looking at p.2 of the official schematic, we can see the existing header CV input is mixed in via a resistor R46 and trimmer VR5. This trimmer can be carefully adjusted to give a 1V/octave response for your external CV.

It would be super-easy to simply wire a jack to the CV point on the header, but this has the disadvantage that inputs are not isolated from each other. Better (and still easy) is to replicate the two passive components and route them to the same mix point.

Here are my additions to the circuit:

Werkstatt CV modification schematic

Werkstatt CV modification schematic

Here is the mod in situ:

Werkstatt CV input mod (top)

Werkstatt CV input mod (top)

Werkstatt CV input mod, rear

Werkstatt CV input mod (rear)

The handiest solder points for connecting the extra components to the existing circuit are TP14 and TP10. Either will do:

Werkstatt CV input mod routing

Werkstatt CV input mod routing

The jack is wired to be brought to the side panel beneath the header. In this photo the Gate mod jack is also in place. The jack grounds are wired together, and then to a solder tag that connects to the nearby screw post. The existing screw is long enough to accommodate a washer or two:

Werkstatt mod ground point

Werkstatt mod ground point

Drilling the hole in the case is simple and quick, and a label finishes the job:

Werkstatt with CV and Gate mods

Werkstatt with CV and Gate mods

The accompanying Gate Input mod is also detailed on this site.

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Parts Used

68k 1/4W 1% MF resistor
100k trimmer
1/8” panel mount socket
3mm solder tag
3mm washers (x2)
wire

Moog Rogue: adding a Filter CV input

The Rogue in its original form includes keyboard CV and Gate inputs and outputs. It’s a slightly odd arrangement of TRS (stereo) jacks – one for the CV, with the input on one terminal and the output on another, plus signal ground, while the Gate connector has an even more awkward arrangement of short-to-ground on one terminal and positive trigger on another, either of which can act as input or output. It’s not great. But it does work, providing you have the right cables.

Rather than split these into separate jacks, which would be a handy mod, I just use custom made cables for my interconnects between CV devices. However, the Rogue lacks a CV input for the filter, which I thought might make a useful addition. It’s a simple enough job.

I decided to use a 3.5mm minijack for the sake of convenience. Pick a spot on the rear panel and drill a suitable hole:

photo showing a newly drilled hole for the Moog Rogue filter CV input modification

Freshly drilled hole for the Filter CV input jack

 

photo showing a newly drilled hole for the Moog Rogue filter CV input modification (inner)

Inner shot of the Filter CV input jack hole

I had a switched 3.5mm mono socket to hand, so used that:

photo showing the Moog Rogue Filter CV input jack (inner)

New Filter CV input jack (inner)

 

photo showing the Moog Rogue Filter CV input jack (outer)

The new Filter CV input jack from outside

Solder a ground wire from the appropriate jack terminal to the Rogue’s jack PCB. Its large solder plane is suitable and easy to work with:

photo showing the ground wire of the new Moog Rogue Filter CV input jack

Grounding the Filter CV input jack

The filter CV input requires a 45k3 resistor to give the same scaling as the keyboard. As presented here, there is no onboard scaling, so if you want to run the input as anything other than 100% follow, use an external amplifier/attentuator. It would also be possible to build such a circuit into the Rogue, but I chose not to for simplicity.

photo showing a resistor soldered to the Moog Rogue Filter CV input jack

Solder a 45k3 resistor to the Filter CV input jack

The other end of that blue wire goes to the filter CV node on the main PCB. Rather than outline it on the schematic, I’ll just show you where that is on the board. This is the point where various filter CV inputs are summed. It’s an easy job to solder a wire at the top of this area:

photo showing the Moog Rogue Filter CV summing node

Filter CV summing node

Here’s a wider shot. Note the longer black wire is a previous bodge and not related to these mods and repairs:

photo showing the Moog Rogue Filter CV summing node and input mod wiring

Filter CV summing node and input jack wiring

I used a Dymo labeller to add the finishing touch to the back panel:

photo showing Moog Rogue Filter CV input jack mod

Filter CV input jack mod, finished!

Hey presto! A filter CV input scaled at the same degree as the keyboard. I use a Kenton MIDI-CV interface, which has an auxiliary output for filter CVs, amongst other things, so this little mod should come in quite handy.

Moog Rogue: replacing the power supply

The Rogue’s original power supply is not ideal. It uses an external transformer in a box with one cable going to the mains, and another cable plugging into a 3.5mm headphone-style minijack on the synth. The minijack delivers a nominal 24V AC, which is then rectified into +12 and -12V DC internally. The power switch on the synth simply connects/disconnects the AC input at the jack.

When I received my Rogue, the transformer was damaged. Rather than buy a replacement, I decided to install a power supply inside the body of the Rogue. There is plenty of room to do this safely.

NB: I take no responsibility for anyone’s actions regarding mains electricity. If you are not confident working with it, don’t. Hand the job to someone qualified.

First job was to desolder the power inlet jack, and solder two wires to the place where the jack was on the main PCB. Unfortunately, the photo below is the best I have at hand. Note the two red wires supplying low-voltage AC:

Photo showing replacement power jack wiring

Power minijack replacement wiring

These two wires go to a connector that allows one to plug or unplug from the transformer for ease of maintenance. There are several kinds of connector that would work; I chose the type found in computer power supplies, as it’s what I had in the spares box:

Photo of replacement power supply connector in Moog Rogue

Replacement power supply connector

The other part of this connector goes to the low-voltage AC output of a transformer. The service notes state the Rogue requires 24V AC at 200mA. I leave selection of a suitable transformer up to you. Note that the Rogue’s rectification is provided by a 78M12 and a 79M12. I used a twin-secondary 12V (with the two 12V secondary windings wired in series to give 24V) rated at 12VA – the Rogue is rated at 6W. Again, I am not taking responsibility for the safety of others here, only providing an outline of my own process.

The transformer is bolted to the base plate of the Rogue. An earth lead is connected to one foot of the transformer:

Replacement mains transformer for Moog Rogue

Replacement mains transformer for Moog Rogue

From the transformer’s mains-level connections, wiring goes to a newly-added mains inlet. I chose the clip-in type with an internal switch and fuse. I cut a rectangular hole in the rear of the Rogue, set low down so as not to interfere with the graphics, which also meant trimming a little of the base plate’s rear lip.

New mains inlet for Moog Rogue

New mains inlet for Moog Rogue

Here is an overview of the result, with tape to secure the looser wires:

Overview of replacement power supply for Moog Rogue

Overview of replacement power supply for Moog Rogue

Here is the result from the outside:

Replacement Moog Rogue power inlet

Replacement Moog Rogue power inlet

 

External view of the screw mounting for the Rogue's replacement transformer

External view of the screw mounting for the Rogue’s replacement transformer

My Rogue also came with a plug to stop up the hole left by removing the power jack:

Photo of the plastic bung used to cover the Moog Rogue's old power inlet jack

Plastic bung to cover the old power inlet

I tend to use the mains switch on the rear, and leave the panel switch set to ON. It would be a simple job to remove and bypass this, but I consider it unnecessary.

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EDIT IN RESPONSE TO A COMMENT: I used a 250V/0.25A fast fuse in a built-in fuse holder in the panel-mounted inlet, which is in addition to the fuse in the UK mains plug. This is a higher current rating than necessary, but it was the lowest I had in my parts box at the time. I have seen two other examples using 120V/0.1A and 120V/0.2A respectively. Your choice of fuse depends on your local mains supply voltage, and you should always select a fuse rated for that supply (eg. nominal 240V here in the UK, 120V in the US, etc.). The current rating should allow enough room for the synth to power up and operate without blowing it. The Rogue is rated at 6W, which works out at 250mA at 24VAC. If we translate that to 240VAC, this drops to a mere 25mA. At 120VAC, it would be 50mA. In either case, a 100mA fuse should be OK.

I’m not going to justify what I now consider rather scruffy wiring – suffice to say that I did this mod three years ago, and would take more care over it these days! However, as it stands this mod has never given a moment’s trouble. I’ve since been in and tidied it up a little.

(2nd April ’18)

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MAINS ELECTRICITY CAN KILL OR SEVERELY INJUR. PLEASE NOTE THAT SAFETY MUST BE PARAMOUNT. IF YOU ARE NOT CONFIDENT WORKING WITH MAINS ELECTRICITY, GET SOMEONE QUALIFIED TO DO THE WORK FOR YOU.

Moog Rogue: cleaning and repairing the dust shield

Between the top panel and the main PCB, the Rogue employs a sheet that fits around the controls to prevent dust from clogging the sliders and switches. For some reason, the material has a tendency to decay, and after 20 years, it’s likely that it has turned to crumbly black goo. This goo is horrible stuff, and will stick to anything. The only remedy is to scrape it away.

My own Rogue arrived after a clean, so I have no photos of this goo. But below is a picture of the switches collecting dust after using the Rogue with no dust protector for a while. Clearly it would be a good idea to not only remove the sticky residue from a decayed dust-shield, but to replace it so as to avoid having to clean all these contacts.

photo of dusty switches in a Moog Rogue

Dusty switches in a Moog Rogue

The best material I have found for the job is neoprene sheeting. It can be found at craft stores, or online, and comes in sheets around 2mm thick, which is ideal for this purpose. I use black sheets around 200 x 300mm in size, though it doesn’t matter much what size the sheets are because they will be cut into much smaller pieces for application.

If we look at the Rogue’s control panel, we can see a cluster of sliders, two separate sliders, and several switches spread across the surface. It would be possible but awkward to cut one sheet to fit all these holes at once, so I chose to use a simpler method: apply individual pieces to the switches, and use larger pieces for the sliders. The switches being relatively broad, I chose to use snug slip-on pieces over each switch. The sliders only need to poke through a slot, so I chose to attach slit pieces to the panel and have the slider tangs poke through.

photo of the interior of a Moog Rogue control panel

Interior of the Moog Rogue control panel

Measuring the panel is easy enough:

photo of a drawing for a Moog Rogue dust protector

Drawing for a template for a Moog Rogue replacement dust shield

The neoprene sheet can be marked with pencil, and scored and cut with a craft knife:

photo of cutting a replacement neoprene dust sheet for a Moog Rogue

Cutting a replacement neoprene dust sheet for a Moog Rogue

Here are some close-ups of the slider protectors:

photo of replacement neoprene dust sheet for slider bank of a Moog Rogue

Replacement neoprene dust sheet for slider bank of a Moog Rogue

Single slider dust protector cut from neoprene sheet for a Moog Rogue

Single slider dust protector cut from neoprene sheet for a Moog Rogue

Checking that it fits:

photo of neoprene dust sheet for a Moog Rogue

Checking the slider dust sheet fits

Fastening the sheets to the panel is also easy. Rather than glue, I use double-sided sticky tape. These strips are about 5mm wide. I buy broader tape and cut the lengths down the middle. Care should be taken applying these taped pieces to the panel as the adhesive sticks quite readily.

photo of dust sheet with tape attached

Using double-sided tape to secure the dust sheet to the panel

photo of Moog Rogue panel with dust sheet attached

Moog Rogue panel with neoprene dust shields attached

The pieces for the switches are more fiddly. I cut small rectangles and used a regular office hole punch to make the holes for the switch to poke through:

photo of a small piece of neoprene with a hole-punched hole

Using a hole punch to make the switch dust protectors

They happen to fit nicely. In retrospect, I would have used larger pieces, as these were a little narrow for my liking, but they still do the job.

photo of neoprene switch dust protectors in place

Switch dust protector pieces in place

Once the job is complete, the panel looks much neater from outside, and the likelihood of dust getting in to clog the controls and damage them is much lower:

photo of Moog Rogue with replacement dust sheet

Finished! The Moog Rogue with fresh replacement dust protectors installed

Moog Rogue: open wide

Opening the Rogue is easy enough. There are five screws to undo on the base and back, and two on the front. It doesn’t matter what order you work in, as long as care is taken while moving the Rogue when it is only partially screwed together, so as to avoid spraining or cracking the screw points. Four screws are located at the corners of the base plate, as outlined in red on the photo below. One screw is located at the bottom of the rear panel, also outlined in red on the photo. Two screws are located on the front, one at each end of the keyboard. The second photo shows one of these partially undone.

photo of the screw points on the base of a Moog rogue

Moog Rogue screw points on baseplate

photo of screw points on front of Moog Rogue

Moog Rogue screw points on front of keyboard

Turn the Rogue upright and lift the lid. The third photo shows my previously-modified Rogue open like this; note the wiring at the left that connects the keyboard to the upper part. This is present in an unmodified Rogue. Be careful not to strain this.

photo of Moog Rogue open for work

Moog Rogue gut shot

To remove the main PCB from the top part, firstly remove all the knobs from the rotary controls and sliders. They should just pull off with little difficulty. The main PCB is attached to the top section by mean of three screws at the front, and a clip at the rear, which is itself attached to the body via three more screws. It is a simple matter to unscrew these in whichever order you feel works best. The clip simply slides off the PCB. The photos below highlight the locations of these screws from inside and out. Note that in the photos I have also removed the jack PCB. This is attached to the rear panel by the nuts around the jack sockets. Simply unscrew them and the PCB pulls away.

photo of Moog Rogue internal screw points

Moog Rogue internal screw points

photo of the location of Moog Rogue screw points for the main PCB, external

Moog Rogue screw points, main PCB, external

The final photo shows the Rogue open with the main PCB and jack PCB removed from the panel.

photo of a Moog Rogue open with PCBs removed for work

Moog Rogue open, with PCBs removed for work

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