Moog Rogue: replacing the power supply

The Rogue’s original power supply is not ideal. It uses an external transformer in a box with one cable going to the mains, and another cable plugging into a 3.5mm headphone-style minijack on the synth. The minijack delivers a nominal 24V AC, which is then rectified into +12 and -12V DC internally. The power switch on the synth simply connects/disconnects the AC input at the jack.

When I received my Rogue, the transformer was damaged. Rather than buy a replacement, I decided to install a power supply inside the body of the Rogue. There is plenty of room to do this safely.

NB: I take no responsibility for anyone’s actions regarding mains electricity. If you are not confident working with it, don’t. Hand the job to someone qualified.

First job was to desolder the power inlet jack, and solder two wires to the place where the jack was on the main PCB. Unfortunately, the photo below is the best I have at hand. Note the two red wires supplying low-voltage AC:

Photo showing replacement power jack wiring

Power minijack replacement wiring

These two wires go to a connector that allows one to plug or unplug from the transformer for ease of maintenance. There are several kinds of connector that would work; I chose the type found in computer power supplies, as it’s what I had in the spares box:

Photo of replacement power supply connector in Moog Rogue

Replacement power supply connector

The other part of this connector goes to the low-voltage AC output of a transformer. The service notes state the Rogue requires 24V AC at 200mA. I leave selection of a suitable transformer up to you. Note that the Rogue’s rectification is provided by a 78M12 and a 79M12. A 12V AC, 12VA unit should suffice – the Rogue is rated at 6W. Again, I am not taking responsibility for the safety of others here, only providing an outline of my own process.

The transformer is bolted to the base plate of the Rogue. An earth lead is connected to one foot of the transformer:

Replacement mains transformer for Moog Rogue

Replacement mains transformer for Moog Rogue

From the transformer’s mains-level connections, wiring goes to a newly-added mains inlet. I chose the clip-in type with an internal switch and fuse. I cut a rectangular hole in the rear of the Rogue, set low down so as not to interfere with the graphics, which also meant trimming a little of the base plate’s rear lip.

New mains inlet for Moog Rogue

New mains inlet for Moog Rogue

Here is an overview of the result, with tape to secure the looser wires:

Overview of replacement power supply for Moog Rogue

Overview of replacement power supply for Moog Rogue

Here is the result from the outside:

Replacement Moog Rogue power inlet

Replacement Moog Rogue power inlet

 

External view of the screw mounting for the Rogue's replacement transformer

External view of the screw mounting for the Rogue’s replacement transformer

My Rogue also came with a plug to stop up the hole left by removing the power jack:

Photo of the plastic bung used to cover the Moog Rogue's old power inlet jack

Plastic bung to cover the old power inlet

I tend to use the mains switch on the rear, and leave the panel switch set to ON. It would be a simple job to remove and bypass this, but I consider it unnecessary.

*

MAINS ELECTRICITY CAN KILL OR SEVERELY INJUR. PLEASE NOTE THAT SAFETY MUST BE PARAMOUNT. IF YOU ARE NOT CONFIDENT WORKING WITH MAINS ELECTRICITY, GET SOMEONE QUALIFIED TO DO THE WORK FOR YOU.

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4 responses to “Moog Rogue: replacing the power supply”

  1. Tony says :

    Hi – nice work… I assume you’re in the UK. Can you post a link for the transformer you used ?

  2. nathanscribe says :

    Hmm. That listing is confusing – it gives both 12V+12V and 6V+6V for the secondaries, but it can’t be both. You’re looking for a 12+12. You want two secondaries with 12V on each, tied in series, to give 24V AC on the output.

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